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Anatomy/Physiology trivia

As some of you here may know I am a licensed massage therapist.  I am also a teachers assistant at the school that I attended.  One of my favorite classes to assist with is Anatomy/Physiology/Biomechanics.  After reading the favorite body parts forum I thought a little trivia might be fun.  Now I do know this might be a little difficult as you will get different answers depending on the source you use to find the answer.  I will try to keep the questions somewhat easy at first with the most common answers you may find.  My massage practice is run from my home so I can log on often to update answers.  Here goes and have fun :)

Your skin or (Integument) is made up of three layers.  The deepest layer is called Hypodermis, the middle layer is called Dermis, What is the name of the outer most layer?

Hint: It is mentioned in a Simpsons episode

Times up!  The correct answer is Epidermis.  The Simpsons Episode that its mentioned in is Season 6 episode 1 where Bart and Lisa get a pool.  All the kids are trying to convince Bart to jump from his treehouse into the pool.  Nelson says "Hey Bart your Epidermis is showing"  :)

Next question.  How bout a bone question.  The arm or superior limb has only one solid bone on bone connection to the torso.  What are the names of the 2 bones?

Please note a joint is not a bone on bone connection point.  The bones in a joint are held together by ligaments.

Hint:  one of the bones is known to be one of the most painful bones to break.    

Humerus connects to scapula to form your shoulder joint

 

Times up!  The correct answer is Epidermis.  The Simpsons Episode that its mentioned in is Season 6 episode 1 where Bart and Lisa get a pool.  All the kids are trying to convince Bart to jump from his treehouse into the pool.  Nelson says "Hey Bart your Epidermis is showing"  :)

 You can usually use the Simpsons as an example or reference to just about anything :)

Kcott your going in the right direction the head of the Humerus does connect to the scapula via the Glenoid cavity and forms the shoulder joint.  However that connection is held together via ligaments and the Muscular sling created by the surrounding muscles, this is why some people can dislocate the Humerus from the Glenoid cavity (Mel Gibson in Lethal Weapon).  If you could pull your own Humerus off at that joint you would discover you can do so without breaking any bones.  But imagine if you pulled the Humerus and Scapula together as a whole...at that point this particular bone would break.

Hint: When we think Scapula our mind goes to the back (dorsal) side of the body.  This bone and the bone it is connected to are on the front (ventral) side of the body. 

 

Hint 2:  The first letter of one of the bones is "C".  The first letter of the other bone is "S" and it is not Scapula (think ventral)

To me that would be the clavical and sternum

Ding Ding!  That was the answer I was looking for.  You know your anatomy :)  Ill post next question in a few hours.

Ding Ding!  That was the answer I was looking for.  You know your anatomy :)  Ill post next question in a few hours.

How bout the spine next?  The spine consists 5 sections.  Cervical, Thoracic, Lumbar, Sacrum, Coccyx.  The Sacrum and Coccyx contain fused Vertebrae.  The remaining 3 sections contain mobile Vertebrae.  How many mobile Vertebrae are in each section?

Hint: a family in the 50's-60's would eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner at the times that correspond to the number of Vertebrae in each section. 

I think it is 7 12 and 5 i know that there are 5 in the lumbar

correct again Kcott88 :)

Speaking of the Sternum...interesting fact:  Sternalis or (rectus sternalis) is a muscle present in only 8% of the population.  When present it is usually fairly insignificant in size.  Why is this so?  The fusion of the sternum limits its functional role as a flexor of the thoracic vertebral column.  As a result, the sternalis has been reduced over evolutionary time.  It is still present and large in other animals with a more mobile sterna, but in humans it has become vestigial.

Speaking of the Sternum...interesting fact:  Sternalis or (rectus sternalis) is a muscle present in only 8% of the population.  When present it is usually fairly insignificant in size.  Why is this so?  The fusion of the sternum limits its functional role as a flexor of the thoracic vertebral column.  As a result, the sternalis has been reduced over evolutionary time.  It is still present and large in other animals with a more mobile sterna, but in humans it has become vestigial.

Next question sticking to bones.  The 3 smallest bones in the body are Malleus, Incus, and Stapes.  In which part of the body are these bones located?

That one is to easy but speaking of those bones.  In an evolution aspect where are these  ones at in a fish?  It is not the ear

Excellent question.  During classroom breaks we often discuss which parts exist in other animals as well as humans.  I believe those bones are in the jaw of the fish.

That is correct our ear bones are part of a fishes jaw

That is correct our ear bones are part of a fishes jaw

Lets try parts of a bone.  We have discussed Vertebrae so lets stick to that.  If you are looking at someones back, on some people, this part of the Vertebrae makes the bumps that run down the spine.

Hint one: a bump in bone is usually referred to as a Process

Time.  The answer was Spinous Process.  Next question will be posted in the morning.  Food for thought;  one of the first lessons my instructor taught me about how to convey information to a group that you want them to remember was to associate that information with one of three things...  TV, SEX, or DRUGS...

One that has really caught on is the following group of muscles that stabilize the scapula and shoulder:  Rhomboid Major, Rhomboid Minor, Levator Scapulae, Trapezius, Serratus Anterior, Pectoralis Minor, Subclavius.  Now i know there are many more but we try to do groups of 7-8 muscles at a time.  First letter of each muscle to form the following sentence:  Roger Rabbit Likes To Smoke Pot (at 3:45 on) Sunday.  The (at 3:45 on) refers to Pectoralis Minor connecting to ribs 3,4,and 5.   

Sticking to bony land marks and the arm and shoulder.  On the Humerus (upper arm or Brachium) there is a groove in the bone where the following muscles attach: Pectoralis Major, Teres Major, and Latissimus Dorsi.  The common action of these muscles is medial rotation and adduction.  What is the name of the groove?

Time.  The answer was Intertubercular groove.  Next question will be posted in the morning.

I just noticed one of my hints is false..  "a bump in bone is usually referred to as a Process"   A bump or elevation in a bone is usually referred to as a tuberosity.  

Do u have any info on knee replacement, like which bones r lost or removed, and also has anybody gone through this procedure? Would like a straight answer. Nobody gives me a straight answer, even my doc. Had an ACL in 85 and it was much more than I was told (I think it's easier now) I'd appreciate any advice. Also does it effect ur ability to have a sexual life again ( I still have 3 yrs to ops)